Join the Global Adaptation Mapping Initiative!

Dear friends and colleagues,
Lots of us around the world are confined to desk-work, including young researchers forced to put fieldwork in standby. Maybe they are looking for some desk-based alternative; in that case, consider joining the GAMI team for the month of May.

GAMI consists of a huge literature review on human adaptation responses to climate-related changes that have been documented globally since 2013, and in order to contribute answering the question “Are we adapting to climate change? (See abstract below). GAMI is led by Dr. Lea Berrang-Ford from Leeds University, Priestley International Centre for Climate, UK. 

Contributing to GAMI may be an excellent opportunity for students to gather material for a thesis chapter and/or a first-author publication. This is not paid employment, but represents an opportunity in that GAMI aims at building an unprecedented database on adaptation literature that GAMI people will be free to use for publications. Such a systematic review however requires a lot of people to help coding the literature. To date, ~2700 are now being coded across a set of questions (Who is responding? What responses are documented? What is the extent of the adaptation-related response? Are adaptation-related responses reported to reduce risk, exposure and/or vulnerability? Etc.). 

We need additional coders to contribute to this work. All documents have been pre-screened. Coders would contribute to extracting adaptation information from a minimum of 50 articles via an on-line data extraction platform we have created.

This is the last wave of coder recruitment, so the timeline to get involved is very tight. The estimated minimum time commitment per coder is 10-15 working days, and the work would need to be completed by June 15th. Interested researchers would thus need to commit at least two weeks (up to three weeks) full-time (or equivalent) asap. The work is done on-line, and work hours are flexible. All training materials are on-line.
Our priority areas of recruitment are :

  1. Food, agriculture, and food security (5-6 more coders)
  2. Asia & Australasia (2-3 more coders)
  3. Poverty, livelihoods, and sustainable development (2-3 more coders)
  4. Central & South America (2 coders)
  5. Ocean/coastal (2 coders)
  6. Other topic teams: could use additional coder capacity (N. America, Europe, Small Island States, Water, Health)

Contact Alexandra Lesnikowski (alexandra.lesnikowski@uwaterloo.ca) or Lea Berrang Ford (l.berrangford@leeds.ac.uk) for more information. 

Cheers,
Lea & the GAMI team

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GAMI Abstract
The Paris Agreement and Katowice Climate Package articulated a clear mandate to document and assess adaptation progress towards the Global Goal on Adaptation. This includes regularly scheduled stocktaking exercises to summarize and synthesise progress on adaptation. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Reports provide an important forum for synthesizing research and evidence to inform the adaptation stocktake. Yet to-date there has been negligible/little robust, systematic synthesis of progress on adaptation or adaptation-relevant responses across the globe. The purpose of this review is thus to systematically map and review human adaptation responses to climate-related changes that have been documented globally since 2013 in the scientific literature.The broad question underpinning this review is: Are we adapting to climate change?More specifically, we ask ‘what is the evidence relating to human adaptation-relevant responses that can (or are) directly reducing risk, exposure, and/or vulnerability to climate change?’ We will review scientific literature since 2013 using Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection to identify documents empirically reporting on adaptation-related responses to climate change in human systems. We exclude non-empirical (theoretical & conceptual) literature and autonomous/ evolutionary adaptation in natural systems. We will then identify a subset of these documents that report on observed responses that can directly reduce risk/exposure/vulnerability (excluding planning, policies, vulnerability assessment, adaptation strategies). This subset will comprise our included documents for coding across a set of questions focused on: Who is responding? What responses are documented? What is the extent of the adaptation-related response? Are adaptation-related responses reported to reduce risk, exposure and/or vulnerability? We will supplement this systematic mapping with an expert elicitation exercise, undertaken to synthesize insights from included/coded literature for global regions and sectors, with associated synthesis statements and confidence assessments. The primary output will be a series of global maps of adaptation based on our review questions, with key insights and confidence levels.

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